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Columbus, Ohio 43210


Purpose:

Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is largely a lifestyle-related condition that is the #1 killer of adults in the United States. Our work is aimed at understanding how short-term increases in blood sugar, like those that accompany eating a meal, affect blood vessel function and the risk of CVD. This research is aimed at understanding how meals composed of eggs affect short-term increases in blood sugar from eating, which are connected with increased risk of CVD. In particular, the investigators are trying to identify a specific meal composed of either whole eggs, egg yolks, or egg whites, that best reduces acute increases in blood sugar brought on by meals that consist of majority carbohydrate. At the same time, the investigators are trying to explore the protective affects that eggs may have on blood vessel function and the reduction of CVD risk.


Study summary:

Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of death in the United States [1]. The inability of your blood vessels to properly enlarge and shrink, known as vascular endothelial dysfunction (VED), is an early event leading to CVD and can be caused by postprandial hyperglycemia (PPH) [1] or short-term increases in blood sugar that occur after you have eaten. Although we do not know how this occurs, research shows that temporary increases in blood sugar impair the blood vessel's ability to properly enlarge and shrink. We also know that impaired vessel function is an early event leading to CVD and that research shows that short-term increases in blood sugar impair blood vessel function, even in healthy people [2]. Because high blood levels of cholesterol increase CVD risk, this has triggered flawed guidelines to restrict cholesterol in our diet [3], including limiting egg consumption. The misguided fear towards eating eggs has been routinely challenged by large-scale studies failing to associate eggs with heart disease risk [4-8]. Research shows that eggs improve the functioning of insulin to reduce blood sugar [9]. They also contain bioactive peptides that may attenuate oxidative stress [10-11]. This provides rationale for their study as a dietary strategy to reduce PPH and VED. Thus, the objective of this study is to define the potential benefits of eggs and its components (egg yolk and egg whites) on blood vessel health in adults with prediabetes.


Criteria:

Inclusion Criteria: 1. fasting glucose 100-125 mg/dL, 2. non-dietary supplement user, 3. no medications affecting vasodilation, inflammation, or energy metabolism, 4. no CVD, 5. nonsmokers, 6. individuals having blood pressure <130/85 mmHg and total cholesterol <240 mg/dL. Exclusion Criteria: 1. unstable weight (±2 kg), 2. vegetarian or egg allergy, 3. alcohol intake >3 drinks/d or >10 drinks/wk), or 4. ≥7 h/wk of aerobic activity.


NCT ID:

NCT02364570


Primary Contact:

Principal Investigator
Richard Bruno, PhD, RD
Ohio State University


Backup Contact:

N/A


Location Contact:

Columbus, Ohio 43210
United States



There is no listed contact information for this specific location.

Site Status: N/A


Data Source: ClinicalTrials.gov

Date Processed: November 24, 2017

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