Expired Study
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St. Louis, Missouri 63110


Purpose:

Continuous pulse oximetry monitoring is the standard of care in critically ill patients in emergency departments, operating rooms and intensive care units. In patients with poor peripheral perfusion (low blood flow) due to peripheral vascular disease, low body temperature, or shock and the use of medications to raise the blood pressure, clinicians have difficulty obtaining an accurate measurement. This study compares the accuracy of forehead oximetry sensors to nasal alar sensors to lab oximetry measures and on the rate of device related pressure ulcers with both.


Study summary:

Continuous pulse oximetry monitoring is the standard of care in critically ill patients in emergency departments, operating rooms and intensive care units. In patients with poor peripheral perfusion (low blood flow) due to peripheral vascular disease, low body temperature, or shock and the use of medications to raise the blood pressure, clinicians have difficulty obtaining an accurate measurement. Several studies have demonstrated the utility of forehead sensor measurements under these clinical conditions. Forehead sensor measurement is considered to be a more central measurement than with digit or ear sensors. However the sensor requires a head band for accurate measurement. On a regular basis, the forehead sensor has led to pressure ulcer development at Barnes-Jewish Hospital despite following vendor recommendations for alternating placement every 8 hours from one side of the forehead to the other. An alternate sensor placed on the nose has recently demonstrated rapid detection of induced drops in oxygen saturation. It has also demonstrated correlation with arterial oxygen saturation measured in a clinical laboratory. The oxygen saturation measurement from the nose is also considered a central measurement. However, studies of the nose sensor were conducted in healthy subjects or during anesthesia care over several hours. Therefore, research is needed to examine the accuracy of the nose sensor in the ICU patient population. In addition, due to concerns for sensor related pressure ulcers in patients with decreased perfusion, the sensor needs to be evaluated for extended periods of time.


Criteria:

Inclusion Criteria: 1. Presence of an existing arterial catheter for blood sampling and one of the following: 1. Difficulty obtaining a consistent signal from a digit or ear sensor or 2. On pressors of at least 0 .10 mcg/kg/min of norepinephrine or 3. Core temperature < or equal to 35 degrees C Exclusion Criteria: 1. Anatomic impediments (burns, wounds, dressings, etc.) to placement of the sensor on the forehead or nasal alar 2. History of known dyshemoglobinemias evidenced by carboxyhemoglobin levels > 10% or methemoglobin level > 2% 3. Severe anemia with hemoglobin < 5 g/dL 4. Pregnant women


NCT ID:

NCT02382133


Primary Contact:

Principal Investigator
Marilyn E Schallom, RN, PhD
Barnes-Jewish Hospital at Washington University


Backup Contact:

N/A


Location Contact:

St. Louis, Missouri 63110
United States



There is no listed contact information for this specific location.

Site Status: N/A


Data Source: ClinicalTrials.gov

Date Processed: November 22, 2017

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