Expired Study
This study is not currently recruiting Study Participants on ClinicalConnection.com. If you would like to find active studies please search for clinical trials.

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104


Purpose:

Head injury is the most common cause of mortality and acquired disability in childhood. It is common to elevate the head of patients at risk for increased intracranial pressure, although it is not clear if it is always beneficial. Every severe pediatric traumatic brain injured patient will have an optimal head position that prevents rising pressure in the brain.


Study summary:

Head injury is the most common cause of mortality and acquired disability on childhood. Management of children at risk for intracranial hypertension is both complex and increasingly controversial. Also, effect of head position on intracranial pressure, cerebral perfusion pressure, adn cerebral venous outflow in the pediatric population has not been studied. We will examine the effect of head positioning on ICP, CPP, and cerebral venous outflow in pediatric patients at risk for intracranial hypertension. The hypothesis is that ICP will be reduced with improvement in cerebral venous outflow by each patient having their own optimal head position.


Criteria:

Inclusion Criteria: - Neonates, children, and adolescents - Intracranial pressure monitor in place Exclusion Criteria: - Severe multiorgan system failure - Hemodynamic instability sufficient to preclude changes in head position


NCT ID:

NCT00636376


Primary Contact:

Principal Investigator
Jimmy Huh, MD
Children's Hospital of Philadelphia


Backup Contact:

N/A


Location Contact:

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104
United States



There is no listed contact information for this specific location.

Site Status: N/A


Data Source: ClinicalTrials.gov

Date Processed: March 16, 2018

Modifications to this listing: Only selected fields are shown, please use the link below to view all information about this clinical trial.


Click to view Full Listing

This study is not currently recruiting Study Participants on ClinicalConnection.com. The form below is not enabled.