Expired Study
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Louisville, Kentucky 40202


Purpose:

The purposes of this study are to determine if the performance of a dialyzer depends on how tightly the hollow fiber membranes are packed in the housing of the dialyzer (the membrane packing density) and if that dependence is a function of the dialysate flow rate. The study will examine how efficiently three different sized molecules pass through a dialyzer membrane at different dialysate flow rates in dialyzers with different membrane packing densities. Transfer of urea, phosphorus and beta-2-microglobulin from blood to dialysate will be measured during clinical hemodialysis using four different dialyzers, each used at three different dialysate flow rates. The data derived from these measurements may provide insight into the importance of membrane packing density as a design parameter for hemodialyzers and if changing the membrane packing density might provide equivalent performance at a lower dialysate flow rate.


Criteria:

Inclusion Criteria: - Stable hemodialysis patients dialyzing through a native fistula or Gore-Tex graft. The access must be capable of delivering a stable blood flow of 400 ml/min. - Age older than 18 years. - Fluid removal requirement less than 3 liters per treatment. Exclusion Criteria: - Noncompliance with dialysis regimen. - Hematocrit less than 28%. - Active infection


NCT ID:

NCT00636077


Primary Contact:

Principal Investigator
Richard Ward, Ph.D.
University of Louisville


Backup Contact:

N/A


Location Contact:

Louisville, Kentucky 40202
United States



There is no listed contact information for this specific location.

Site Status: N/A


Data Source: ClinicalTrials.gov

Date Processed: January 23, 2018

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