Expired Study
This study is not currently recruiting Study Participants on ClinicalConnection.com. If you would like to find active studies please search for clinical trials.

St. Louis, Missouri 63110


Purpose:

Concurrent chemotherapy and radiation therapy are the standard of care for inoperable patients with esophagus cancer. Unfortunately, the 5-year survival of 20% for this population is quite low. Methods to intensify radiation therapy delivery without increasing local toxicities are needed. Intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) is an advanced method of delivering external beam radiation that may minimize the volume of normal tissue irradiated to high dose and thus decrease the risk of normal tissue toxicity. The proposed study will prospectively test whether IMRT is tolerable for delivering IMRT doses of 60 Gy for patients with esophagus cancer.


Criteria:

Inclusion Criteria: - Age >= 18 - Karnofsky Performance Status of >= 60 - TNM Stages T1-4, N0-3, M0 - Pathologic confirmation of esophagus cancer - Evaluation by medical oncologist determines that the patient is medically fit for concurrent chemotherapy - Evaluation by surgeon determines that patient is unresectable Exclusion Criteria: - Age < 18 - Karnofsky Performance Status < 60 - Radiographic or pathologic evidence of distant metastatic disease (classified as M1b in AJCC staging manual) - Prior radiation therapy to the thorax or upper abdomen, preventing definitive radiation therapy. - Pregnant or lactating, if female.


NCT ID:

NCT00593723


Primary Contact:

Principal Investigator
Jeffrey Bradley, MD
Washington University School of Medicine


Backup Contact:

N/A


Location Contact:

St. Louis, Missouri 63110
United States



There is no listed contact information for this specific location.

Site Status: N/A


Data Source: ClinicalTrials.gov

Date Processed: March 16, 2018

Modifications to this listing: Only selected fields are shown, please use the link below to view all information about this clinical trial.


Click to view Full Listing

This study is not currently recruiting Study Participants on ClinicalConnection.com. The form below is not enabled.