Expired Study
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Houston, Texas 77030


Purpose:

The literature and our preliminary studies found that in COPD patients, psychosocial factors affect quality of life (QOL) and functioning more than would be expected given the severity of their disease. To improve QOL and functioning in the approximately 50% of COPD patients with significant anxiety and/or depressive symptoms, interventions are needed. Much research documents the utility of cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) in treating depression and anxiety, showing it to have promise as a self-management intervention to improve QOL in COPD patients.


Study summary:

Background: The literature and our preliminary studies found that in COPD patients, psychosocial factors affect quality of life (QOL) and functioning more than would be expected given the severity of their disease. To improve QOL and functioning in the approximately 50% of COPD patients with significant anxiety and/or depressive symptoms, interventions are needed. Much research documents the utility of cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) in treating depression and anxiety, showing it to have promise as a self-management intervention to improve QOL in COPD patients. Objectives: Objectives were to compare CBT for anxiety and depression with COPD education for COPD patients with moderate-to-severe anxiety and/or depressive symptoms. Methods: Veterans were recruited from VAMC clinics and through press releases. Two hundred and thirty-eight COPD patients with comorbid anxiety and/or depressive symptoms were randomized to either 8 weeks of CBT/usual care or 8 weeks of COPD Education/usual care. We hypothesized that COPD patients receiving CBT/usual care would improve more than COPD patients receiving COPD Education/usual care. Improvement was defined as increased disease-specific QOL, generic QOL, and 6-minute walk distance; and decreased depression, anxiety, and health service use. Outcomes were examined pre-, mid- and post-treatment and at 4, 8 and 12 months. Status: The study was scheduled to officially end December 31, 2005, but was granted a no-cost extension by HSR&D to complete data analyses and prepare final papers. The extension was granted through June 30, 2006. As of the date of this final report, the study is complete.


Criteria:

Inclusion Criteria: Moderate depression or anxiety, COPD Exclusion Criteria:


NCT ID:

NCT00105911


Primary Contact:

Principal Investigator
Mark E. Kunik, MD MPH
Michael E. DeBakey VA Medical Center, Houston, TX


Backup Contact:

N/A


Location Contact:

Houston, Texas 77030
United States



There is no listed contact information for this specific location.

Site Status: N/A


Data Source: ClinicalTrials.gov

Date Processed: December 15, 2017

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