Expired Study
This study is not currently recruiting Study Participants on ClinicalConnection.com. If you would like to find active studies please search for clinical trials.

Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15213


Purpose:

This study will compare the safety, efficacy, and tolerability of electroacupuncture (EA) and sham electroacupuncture (SA) for the treatment of major depression.


Study summary:

Major depression is a common and serious mental illness. It is associated with a markedly lower quality of life, significant functional impairment, and premature death due to suicide or comorbid physical illness. Over the past 50 years, effective and safe treatments for major depression have been developed, including antidepressant pharmacotherapy, psychotherapy, and electroconvulsive therapy. However, many Americans who suffer from a depressive disorder either do not elect to receive one of these conventional treatments or do not complete an adequate course of treatment. A growing number of Americans with depression are choosing to be treated with complementary and alternative therapies. Acupuncture, in particular, is increasingly being used to treat depression even though only limited data support its safety and efficacy. This study will use a randomized parallel-group design to compare the safety, efficacy, and tolerability of electroacupuncture (EA) and sham electroacupuncture (SA) for the treatment of major depression. Over a 15-month period, 60 adult outpatients with a major depressive disorder of mild or moderate severity (as defined by the DSM-IV) will be randomized to either 12 sessions of EA or SA to be provided over 6 weeks. Safety and symptomatic improvement (as measured with the Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression [HRSD]) will constitute the primary outcome measures. Tolerability and functional improvement will constitute secondary outcome measures.


Criteria:

Inclusion Criteria: - Meet SCID criteria for a Major Depressive Disorder (Single or Recurrent) with a current major depressive episode of mild or moderate severity - Significant symptoms of depression (HRSD > 14) - Ability to communicate in English - Give informed consent in accordance with local IRB regulations Exclusion Criteria: - Personal physician's recommendation against enrollment because the patient is physically unstable or for other reasons - Having been treated with acupuncture for any condition - History of seizure disorder or significant risk factors for a seizure disorder (e.g., history of brain trauma, recent stroke, or brain tumor) - Need to remain on antidepressant or other psychotropic medications - Absence of depressive symptoms severe enough (i.e., HRSD < 14) at the baseline assessments - Significant cognitive impairment, as assessed by a total score on the MMSE < 25. A recommendation for referral to a neurologist or a psychiatrist will be made to the patient in these cases. - Chronic major depression (i.e, duration of 2 years or longer) A recommendation for referral to a psychiatrist will be made in these cases. - Major depressive episode severe or severe with psychotic features (as per DSM-IV/SCID) or with acutely suicidality. A recommendation for psychiatric referral will be made in these cases. Bipolar disorder, psychotic features, or a psychotic disorder (specifically: schizophrenia, delusional disorder, or schizoaffective disorder). A recommendation for psychiatric referral will be made in these cases. - Met criteria for a diagnosis of alcohol substance abuse or dependence within the past six months. A recommendation for referral to a mental health professional will be made in these cases.


NCT ID:

NCT00071110


Primary Contact:

Principal Investigator
Benoit H Mulsant, MD
University of Pittsburgh


Backup Contact:

N/A


Location Contact:

Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15213
United States



There is no listed contact information for this specific location.

Site Status: N/A


Data Source: ClinicalTrials.gov

Date Processed: December 15, 2017

Modifications to this listing: Only selected fields are shown, please use the link below to view all information about this clinical trial.


Click to view Full Listing

This study is not currently recruiting Study Participants on ClinicalConnection.com. The form below is not enabled.