Bethesda, Maryland 20892


Purpose:

Chediak-Higashi syndrome (CHS) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterized in its classical form by oculocutaneous albinism, a bleeding diathesis, recurrent infection due to abnormal neutrophil and natural killer cell function, and eventual progression to a lymphohistiocytic infiltration known as the accelerated phase . Death often occurs within the first decade as a result of infection or the development of the accelerated phase; bone marrow transplantation is curative except for the late occurrence of neurological deterioration. The basic defect is unknown, although it probably involves abnormal fusion or trafficking of intracellular vesicles. Patients with classical CHS have their disease due to mutations in the LYST gene, but mildly affected individuals have been reported whose genetic defect has not been defined. It is likely that these variants of CHS have abnormalities in proteins involved in the pathways responsible for vesicle fusion. Since the full clinical spectrum of CHS and its variants has not been characterized, and the underlying defects remain enigmatic, we plan to evaluate this group of patients clinically, biochemically, and molecularly, and perform cell biological studies on their fibroblasts, melanocytes, and transformed lymphoblasts. Routine admissions will be 5 days and may occur every two years, or required by changes in clinical symptomatology.


Study summary:

Chediak-Higashi syndrome (CHS) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterized in its classical form by oculocutaneous albinism, a bleeding diathesis, recurrent infection due to abnormal neutrophil and natural killer cell function, and eventual progression to a lymphohistiocytic infiltration known as the accelerated phase . Death often occurs within the first decade as a result of infection or the development of the accelerated phase; bone marrow transplantation is curative except for the late occurrence of neurological deterioration. The basic defect is unknown, although it probably involves abnormal fusion or trafficking of intracellular vesicles. Patients with classical CHS have their disease due to mutations in the LYST gene, but mildly affected individuals have been reported whose genetic defect has not been defined. It is likely that these variants of CHS have abnormalities in proteins involved in the pathways responsible for vesicle fusion. Since the full clinical spectrum of CHS and its variants has not been characterized, and the underlying defects remain enigmatic, we plan to evaluate this group of patients clinically, biochemically, and molecularly, and perform cell biological studies on their fibroblasts, melanocytes, and transformed lymphoblasts. Routine admissions will be 5 days and may occur every two years, or required by changes in clinical symptomatology.


Criteria:

- INCLUSION CRITERIA: All patients entering this study will have some degree of oculocutaneous albinism plus either a bleeding diathesis or a history of excessive infections in childhood. Objective evidence of a platelet storage pool deficiency (e.g., an abnormal secondary aggregation response or absent platelet dense bodies) or of a lysosomal fusion abnormality (e.g., giant cytoplasmic granules in leucocytes) will not be required. EXCLUSION CRITERIA: Patients will be excluded if they cannot travel to NIH due to their medical condition. Patients who are less than one month old will be excluded.


NCT ID:

NCT00005917


Primary Contact:

Principal Investigator
Wendy J Introne, M.D.
National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI)

Wendy J Introne, M.D.
Phone: (301) 451-8879
Email: wi2p@nih.gov


Backup Contact:

N/A


Location Contact:

Bethesda, Maryland 20892
United States

For more information at the NIH Clinical Center contact Patient Recruitment and Public Liaison Office (PRPL)
Phone: 800-411-1222
Email: prpl@mail.cc.nih.gov

Site Status: Recruiting


Data Source: ClinicalTrials.gov

Date Processed: September 22, 2017

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